The Quantified Communications Blog

  • Jan 15, 2020

    Can We Use Computational Social Science to Detect Fake News?

    In case you hadn’t heard, 2020 is an election year. And that means we’ll be inundated with political news from all sides (as if we hadn’t been already). But in this “post-truth” world of fake news and alternative facts, how can we ensure that what we’re reading, believing, and sharing leading up to the election is real news?

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  • Jan 09, 2020

    Building Leadership Habits in the New Year

    Research has found that it takes approximately sixty-six days to build a habit. That is, it takes just over two months for a new behavior to become second nature. So think about that as you plan out your new year’s resolutions. Whether you’re committing to hit the gym regularly, drink eight glasses of water a day, or anything else, know that if you push through for the first two months, playing the game of “mind over matter,” then your new habit will finally start to become old hat.

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  • Dec 23, 2019

    Looking toward 2020: 5 Predictions for Behavioral Analytics in the New Decade

     

    Where has the year gone? It seems like just yesterday we were gearing up for 2019, and now here we are, getting ready to ring in 2020 and a new decade.

    This past year, many of our discussions have been around planning for “the future of work” and how technology will transform the way businesses operate, the way leaders steer the ship, and the capabilities employees and aspiring leaders need to support their brands and build their careers. All this talk of disruption can certainly be anxiety inducing, but when companies get ahead of it, leveraging innovations in technology and performance science to prepare for the next iterations of business, they can establish serious advantages that propel significant growth in 2020 and beyond.

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  • Dec 15, 2019

    What to Expect in This Month’s Democratic Debate

    Campaign season is well under way for the 2020 election, and for most Americans, that signals a time to think carefully about candidates’ policies, platforms, credentials, and values. For the team here at Quantified, we’re also taking a careful look at the  candidates’ communication styles.

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  • Dec 11, 2019

    The Future of Leadership Development: Experience Platforms

    In the last couple of decades, leadership development has undergone drastic transformation. From the physical universities like GE Crotonville and Accenture St. Charles to virtual, e-learning software platforms to bite-sized MOOCs from platforms like Lynda.com and even YouTube, L&D has been desperately seeking a structure that both fits into employees’ schedules and enables lasting improvement.

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  • Dec 04, 2019

    How—and Why—to Turn Employees into Lifelong Learners

    We’re hearing a lot of buzz lately about preparing employees for the “future of work.” Here at Quantified, we’ve weighed in once or twice on the importance of providing quality training and development opportunities for employees, ensuring they have the skills required to continue helping the company grow—but also encouraging long-term loyalty and engagement.

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  • Nov 27, 2019

    Leadership Communication Lessons from Professional Speechwriters

    Last month, I had the honor of speaking at the Professional Speechwriters Association’s 2019 World Conference in Washington, D.C. The theme of this year’s conference was “Leadership Communication: Next,” and the program promised to shake up attendees’ ideas of executive communication best practices and challenge us to think more deeply about time-tested techniques.

    And boy did executive director David Murray and my fellow speakers deliver. Here are four of my favorite takeaways from the conference.

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  • Nov 20, 2019

    Should Leaders Apologize? Sorry, but Research Says Maybe Not.

    These days, it seems like once a week, some public figure or another is making a controversial statement that’s met by many with demands for apologies and/or consequences. And general consensus would argue that, when a leader—corporate, political, or otherwise—realizes he or she has made an insensitive statement, a sincere apology is in order to save face, demonstrate character and make peace with the public. But recent research shows that, following a gaffe, apologizing might not be the right way to go.

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  • Nov 13, 2019

    Developing a Culture of Inclusion in the Workplace

    In recent years, inclusion has evolved from an idealistic workplace buzzword to a must-have component of company culture. Definitions vary from source, but inclusion boils down to the idea that, regardless of background, viewpoints, or beliefs, every team member’s contributions are valued and worthy of respect.

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  • Nov 06, 2019

    Reskilling and Upskilling: A Primer

    In all the buzz about the future of work, there are two terms we hear over and over: reskilling and upskilling. As in “Businesses will need to reskill their employees as automation changes the nature of their jobs.” Or “In today’s tight labor market, employees are looking for jobs that support their ongoing development, so savvy businesses are investing in upskilling their top talent.”

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